Lake Erie Regional Grape Program Enrollment

Program Areas

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  • Vineyard Nutrition
  • Crop Management
  • Market Development
  • Farm Business

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FALL   •   WINTER   •   SPRING   •   SUMMER          New Vineyard Timeline
Grape - Fall Content

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT   •   CULTURAL PRACTICES   •   IPM   •   VINE NUTRITION AND SOILS


2-years Pre-plant · Review Soil Maps

Like gardening in your backyard, soil composition and structure are important in wine grape production. Luckily, soil maps are easy to access, whether through the USDA Web Soil Survey, or books from your local extension office. (See following 3 images below).

Soil Survey Cover

figure 1: soil survey

Gravelly, well-drained soil is ideal in grape production, because grapevine roots do not want to be submerged in water. On the flip side, too-well-drained soil can create an issue with nutrition, as in, the soil organic matter might be too low to sustain wine grape production.

Soil Map of the Lake Erie Research and Extension Laboratory

figure 2: A soil map of the Cornell Lake Erie Research and Extension Laboratory (CLEREL) in Portland, NY from the Soil Survey of Chautauqua County, New York compiled by the USDA and the Soil Conservation Service

CLEREL Soil Type

figure 3: A close-up of the CLEREL site shows the different soil types.
The soil is mostly well-drained Chenengo (CnA/CnB).

CLEREL Soil Map

A CLEREL soil map from the USDA Web Soil Survey site

Soil maps can also provide and excellent base for your vineyard maps. If there are two different soil types at your site, consider planting one block of vines to each soil type, IF this is also practical. Nutrient management will be much easier once you are aware of possible drainage or nutrient differences. Finally, when you submit soil samples, you will need to enter the soil type on the form for the soil tests and for more appropriate recommendations.


Content by:

Dr. Jodi Creasap Gee
Viticulture Extension Educator
Lake Erie Regional Grape Program


calendar of events

Upcoming Events

2018 LERGP Winter Grape Grower Conference

Event Offers DEC Credits

March 14, 2018
8:00am-4:00pm
Fredonia, NY

We are in the planning stages of this event, but we have secured the facility and date! Put us on your calendar and come spend the day with us!
view details

Announcements

Tim Weigle receives Excellence in IPM award

Portland, NY. August 11, 2017: As a kid, Tim Weigle often tagged along with his dad, a plant breeder at Iowa State University. It gave him a taste for agriculture and research. But once in college he took an entomology class and everything changed. That class included an introduction to integrated pest management (IPM).
“I was fascinated by the interaction of plant systems and pest complexes,” Weigle says. So he added IPM to his bachelor’s program, then topped it off with a master’s in horticulture. “It gave me the solid foundation in crop production I needed to practice IPM,” he says.
Now, for nearly 30 years of innovative, farmer-focused IPM research and outreach in the Lake Erie Regional Grape Program (LERGP), Tim Weigle has earned an Excellence in IPM award from the New York State IPM Program (NYS IPM).
Examples- Weigle helped build a dense concentration of grower-owned weather stations linked together online through NEWA" the Network for Environment and Weather Applications" to predict when to scout for destructive grape berry moths and a hit list of other pests. And he’s applied LERGP research to use tractor-mounted sensors, each with a chip providing data for creating color-coded maps. These maps pinpoint where destructive grape rootworms are probably at work underground.
“This means you can check just those spots for grape rootworm and spot-treat only them,” Weigle says.”
Then there’s Weigle’s leadership on the Organic Guide for Grapes and the Pest Management Guidelines for both grape and hops. He’s also been a trailblazer in IPM research and outreach for the hopyards that help fuel New York’s microbreweries.
But it’s his way with people that really sets Tim Weigle apart. Sure, the internet has a lot to offer. But nobody wants a faceless Extension. Weigle created weekly “coffee pot meetings,” held at vineyards all along Lake Erie’s grape belt. Indeed, they’re what “face time” is all about. They don’t even have an agenda. Instead, they’re driven by what’s got farmers curious or worried that week.
“Some of those early coffee pot meetings were at our vineyard, back when our son was just a little kid,” says Dawn Betts of Betts Farms LLC. “I remember one time we’d all gone out to the vineyard, and Tim was talking about grape berry moths. Well, our son went down the row and picked some of the stung berries where the moths had laid their eggs. And Tim said ‘if this young man can do it, you can too.’”
The Betts family goes to a lot of those meetings. “We learn from each other,” Betts says. “If one of us has an issue, chances are the others will soon.”
“Tim does a fabulous job of incorporating the fundamentals of biology while bringing the latest science to address growers’ challenges,” says Jennifer Grant, director of NYS IPM. “We’re proud to have him on our NYS IPM team.”
Weigle received his award at the Lake Erie Regional Grape Program’s Summer Conference on August 11, 2017. Learn more about IPM at nysipm.cornell.edu.






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